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Preparation of Damascus steel dial

roadwarrior

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Clemens Helberg

ART1: Preparation of Damascus steel dial
I will show you within the next few days how the damascus steel blocks are getting turned into some cool sandwich dials. Lots´of handworks and expensive tools and procedures are required to transform pure steel into a one of a kind dial.



1)The damascus steel block from my knifemaker was turned down to the required dial diameter. Out of this long damascus steel block the single 0.40mm thick dials are cutted.



2) Picture two shows the 0.40mm thick dial cutted out of this block. Looks very unspectacular right now.
🙂




3)
  1. The third picture shows the dials after just a few minutes of etching to confirm the dials are having the right pattern and structure. On the left side there you see the damascus pattern called "explosion damascus" and on the right the "chess damascus". The explosion damascus steel dials will from now being processed.
TO BE CONTINUED!
🙂
 

roadwarrior

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Part 2: Sanding of the damascus steel dials
Yesterday I was sanding down the damascus steel dials with sanding paper. Starting with 400 grain sanding paper, over 800 grain sanding paper and finishing the dry sanding with 1500 grain. When the dial was sanded with 1500 grain the surface is looking slightly polished already and you could see the pattern of the damascus steel already starting shining through even without chemical etching. Today the dials will be wet polished with higher grains of up to 15000 grain. So this is a highly manual task that´s been done with human muscels.
🙂


 

roadwarrior

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Part 3: Polishing the damascus steel dials

After sanding the damascus steel dials I proceeded today with polishing the dials. It took several of hours of wet-sanding with up to 15000 grain. The final polishing was made on the polishing machine and is also bringing up already the pattern of the damascus steel. Very difficult to photograph as you only see the reflections.
🙂


 

roadwarrior

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PART 4: DEEP ETCHING and POLISHING (again)
After the dial was mirror polished it was time to deep etch the damascus steel dial. When it comes out of the chrmicals it doesn´t look that appealing!
🙂


After deep etching the dial will be high polished again.
For the next 12 hours the polished dial will now be etched again to get even darker black etched color and polished again.

 

roadwarrior

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PART 5: LASER ENGRAVING
The laser engraving/cutting is made on one of my new laser systems. The engraving process Is now effective and with unlimited possibilities for the design, but never forget this Made in Germany YAG laser machine costs around 80.000 Euro.

80,000 Euro equals
$97,204.00 United States Dollar
Jan 13, 8:51 PM UTC · Disclaimer


 

gopennstate

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I'm enjoying this series of posts that show how the damascus dials are made. One of these dials are for my US Flag K2 6k meters DLC being made.
 

roadwarrior

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I'm enjoying this series of posts that show how the damascus dials are made. One of these dials are for my US Flag K2 6k meters DLC being made.
The more I see the work, I appreciate the technology and looking forward to seeing future creative dials from Clemens. Congrats to all who scored one of the 2020 offerings.
 

roadwarrior

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PART 6: Finalizing the damascus steel dials
Each one of the 50 stars in the dial has a width of just 0.70mm or 0.026 inch.

 
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